Exclusive: America's Most Forgotten: The Victims of Illegal Alien Crime - Alison Kunhardt & Tessa Tranchant

by CAROLYN COOKE, AMERICA’S MOST FORGOTTEN: THE VICTIMS OF ILLEGAL ALIEN CRIME July 8, 2009
Editor’s note: This is the next in a continuing series about the forgotten victims of illegal alien crime – weekly stories you do not see in the mainstream media.
 
America’s Most Forgotten is dedicated to the all of the innocent people and their families who have been victimized by illegal aliens as a result of the refusal of our elected officials to enforce United States immigration law and to secure our borders. Americans remain unprotected from this unwanted invasion of unidentified people from across the world. No region of the country has been spared and the citizens presented come from all walks of life. Crisscrossing the nation, we have a predominantly African-American neighborhood in LA, then we skip to an affluent, successful actress in New York City and then to a rural Mississippi family hoping to escape big city crime and then to a Native American in small town Idaho. And on, and on, and on...
 
Virginia – Alison Kunhardt and Tessa Tranchant
 
Teenage friends Alison Kundhardt and Tessa Tranchant died after being hit from behind, while stopped at a red light, by an intoxicated illegal alien going at least 25 miles over the speed limit.
 
Tessa Tranchant and Alison Kunhardt were the best of friends, inseparable to the point of often finishing each others sentences. On March 30, 2007, they were involved in a fatal car accident in Virginia Beach, Virginia, on their way to a classmate’s house.
 
The girls were stopped at an intersection waiting for the light to change when Alfredo Ramos, an illegal alien, intoxicated and traveling over 70 miles hour in a 45 mph zone, slammed into the back of their car. The girls were pinned in the crumpled wreckage of the Plymouth Duster and had to be cut free before treatment. Both were wearing seatbelts. Tessa died at the scene and Alison was transported to Sentara Virginia Beach Hospital, where she passed away in her mother’s arms.
 
Alison’s mother, Corby Lane, recalled “holding her daughter for the first time at Sentara Virginia Beach Hospital and for the last, at the same hospital. There is no pain like losing a child.”
 
Hundreds gathered at a candle light vigil honoring the lives of Tessa and Alison. Colette Tranchant, Tessa’s mom comforted the mourners. “Tessa and Allie died together”, she said. “They went to heaven together.”  
 
The two friends met when Alison’s mother began dating Tessa’s father. They shared the same sense of humor. Dylan Tranchant, Tessa’s older brother, described the girls’ special relationship. “It almost becomes like an improv comedy when they’re together. They were a perfect pair.”
 
Alison Kundhardt was 17 years old. Alison’s father David talked about her plans to become an interior decorator. He remembered Alison as always “upbeat” and having a “great sense of humor.” He said she loved music and theater, but most of all, she loved hanging out with Tessa.
 
Tessa Tranchant was 16 years old. Colette Tranchant said Tessa aspired to become a chef and “loved to sing and surf.” Friends described Tessa as “a goofy, sassy, positive girl.”
 
Collette says her “life is empty” without Tessa. She mourns the future Tessa will never experience with college, a career or children. Ray Tranchant considered suicide in July of 2007. “I think about being with Allie every day,” he wrote in a statement to the judge.
 
“If I were to have one wish, it is that Alfredo Ramos would have to visit Ali and Tessa at Princess Anne Memorial Park Cemetery for the rest of his life,” David Kunhardt read from his statement following the Ramos sentencing hearing.
 
Alfredo Ramos, 22 years old, pled guilty to two counts of aggravated involuntary manslaughter. He had a blood alcohol three times the legal limit. He was given the maximum sentence of 40 years, with 16 years suspended. He will then be deported.
 
Ramos had a history of prior convictions, yet due to the sanctuary policies of two Virginia towns, his immigration status was never questioned or examined. He was convicted in Virginia Beach of public drunkenness in 2006. In 2007, Two months prior to killing Allison and Tessa, he was arrested for identity theft, public drunkenness and a DUI in Chesapeake. The arresting officer said Ramos almost ran over him. He was driving with a fake license and a blood alcohol level twice the legal limit.
 
Ray Tranchant sent a letter to Chesapeake and Virginia Beach city attorneys, accusing them of allowing Ramos “to remain in the country because they failed to determine he was an illegal immigrant and report him to immigration officials.” He said, “My problem is that I feel the only way I can get the federal government’s attention at this point is to sue them, to sue the state of Virginia and sue the localities here that allow these people to come here and break federal laws, even misdemeanors, and not get deported.” He is not interested in money, but wants to bring about change. Tranchant has become an advocate for the enforcement of immigration law.
 
On April 3, 2009, Ray Tranchant testified before at House Joint panel in the United States House of Representatives about his daughter’s death at the hands of an illegal immigrant. A picture of Tessa stood behind him as he told her story and advocated for the enforcement of United States Immigration Law.
 
Both Chesapeake and Virginia Beach have passed ordinances changing their sanctuary city policies. Both cities have passed laws requiring businesses working for the city to pledge not to hire illegal aliens. Virginia Beach checks the immigration status of all arrests. A new statewide law requires local jails to check the immigration status of all foreign national detainees with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).
 
Allison Kundhardt and Tessa Tranchant would be alive today if Ramos had been stopped at the border. Elected officials and law enforcement failed to act to enforce immigration laws once he illegally crossed into the United States, leaving two young women on the cusp of adulthood dead and their families struggling to deal with their losses.
 
Americans should not have to live in fear in their own neighborhoods.
 
Enforcement legislation, passed by a few states, has led illegal aliens to leave because the magnets of jobs and taxpayer benefits have been removed. This is a dirty little secret that elected officials in Washington on both sides of the aisle do not want you to know.
 
Are you concerned about this epidemic of death at the hands of illegal aliens? Tell your elected officials what you think.
 
 
FamilySecurityMatters.org Contributing Editor Carolyn Cooke is an American citizen activist committed to the preservation of a sovereign United States.
 

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