Prez of Young Democrats and Mayor de Blasio staffer busted for kiddie porn; one victim 6-mos. old

by JIM KOURI, CPP June 7, 2017

Jacob Schwartz, 29, an employee in New York Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration, was busted by New York police and charged with child pornography for his alleged obtaining and storing of 3,000 images and 89 videos on his laptop computer. The images included those of "young nude females between the approximate ages of 6 months and 16, engaging in sexual conduct...on an adult male," court papers say. 

Commentator Mike Cernovich pointed out on Twitter that the MSM's silence on Jacob Schwartz could have something to do with Schwartz having been a guest on CNN blaming Hillary's loss on "racism" and Russia and his close ties to major players in the Democratic Party including former President Barack Obama. (https://twitter.com/ManhattanDems/status/847855357506486272

The target of an investigation since March, Schwartz surrendered to NYPD computer-crimes investigators in Manhattan's 13th Precinct on Thursday morning, April 25, 2017. He was charged with promoting a sexual performance by a child and possessing a sexual performance by a child under 16, both felonies, and released on $7,500 bail.

Schwartz is employed as a $66,360-a-year computer programmer analyst in New York City's Department of Design and Construction. Schwartz is also president of the Manhattan Young Democrats and the downstate region vice president of the New York State Young Democrats. A photo posted last year on Twitter shows him with Robby Mook, then the campaign manager for Hillary Clinton's failed presidential campaign.

Schwartz's father is a prominent Democratic insider - labor lawyer Arthur Schwartz, who was New York counsel to Bernie Sanders' failed presidential campaign. Calling his son's case "a personal tragedy," Arthur said: "I understand these are serious charges. He's already in therapy for this." 

Arthur Schwartz had his own brush with the law in 2015, when he was busted for removing hidden surveillance cameras trained on the front door of a $700-a-month, rent-control apartment occupied by a 93-year-old client who was battling her landlord. Prosecutors agreed to drop felony grand larceny charges in exchange for Arthur paying $720 in restitution.

The Scourge of Child Pornography: FBI Report

North Hills Man Sentenced to 18 Years in Prison for Producing Sexual Images of Minors. Melrose Man Sentenced to 60 Months for Child Pornography Offenses. Boylston Man Charged with Distributing Child Pornography. Navajo Man from Churchrock Pleads Guilty to Federal Child Sexual Abuse Charge. Vestal Man Pleads Guilty to Distributing and Receiving Child Pornography. Binghamton Man Pleads Guilty to 12 Counts of Distributing Child Pornography.

Rarely a week goes by in the United States that a child pornographer is not charged or sentenced for federal crimes related to the sexual exploitation of children. The press release headlines above from the Department of Justice were issued on a single day last month.

In coordination with local, state, federal, and international partners-both law enforcement and non-governmental organizations-the FBI devotes extensive resources to fighting the sexual exploitation of children. And while the high number of arrests and convictions speaks to law enforcement's successes, there is still much work to be done. According to a 2016 Department of Justice report to Congress, "The expansion of the Internet has led to an explosion in the market for child pornography."

"After you've been doing this awhile, you think you've seen it all, and then you get a new case," said Special Agent Eric Campbell, who investigates violent crimes against children in the FBI's Phoenix Division. "I am surprised by how often I am surprised at what people will do."

Campbell points to one of his recent cases as an example. In February 2017, a 28-year-old Arizona woman was sentenced to more than five years in prison for mailing child pornography to her imprisoned husband. He was behind bars in Tucson awaiting trial on separate child pornography charges-for which he would eventually receive a 20-year sentence.

Some of the images the woman mailed her husband were of girls as young as 9 years old. "She was trying to sneak them into the prison," Campbell said, "trying to give her husband what he wanted."

The FBI coordinates its efforts to protect children through the Violent Crimes Against Children (VCAC) program. The mission is to lower the vulnerability of children to sexual exploitation, to provide a rapid and effective investigative response to such crimes, and to provide appropriate training and other resources to state and local law enforcement partners.

Investigations are conducted in each of the FBI's 56 field offices by Child Exploitation Task Forces, which combine Bureau resources with those of other federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. Nearly 400 law enforcement partner organizations participate in these task forces and are assisted by FBI intelligence analysts, victim specialists, and subject matter experts. The task forces also work closely with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC).

In addition, because the Internet has blurred traditional notions of borders and jurisdiction, the FBI's legal attaché offices in more than 60 countries around the world coordinate with their foreign counterparts on investigations ranging from child sex trafficking to sex tourism.

Those who engage in the production and distribution of child pornography come from all walks of life and represent varied ages, races, occupations, and education levels. Typically, their crimes are carried out on the so-called dark web-where they can remain anonymous-and their actions are unknown to spouses, families, and associates.

"Most of these guys don't have any criminal history," Campbell said, "and no one has any idea of what they were doing until we catch them." The agent said that the work he and his colleagues do is important, but also emotionally wrenching. "The payoff," he explained, "is that you are able to uncover these perpetrators and shine a light on them, and do everything possible to make sure they are no longer able to victimize innocent children."

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Jim Kouri, CPP is currently vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and a staff writer for the New Media Alliance (thenma.org). He's former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed "Crack City" by reporters covering the drug war in the 1980s. In addition, he served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for several major organizations. He’s also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. Kouri writes for many police and security magazines including Chief of Police, Police Times, The Narc Officer and others. He’s a news writer for TheConservativeVoice.Com and PHXnews.com, a columnist for AmericanDaily.Com, MensNewsDaily.Com, MichNews.Com, and he’s syndicated by AXcessNews.Com. He’s appeared as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows including Oprah, McLaughlin Report, CNN Headline News, MTV, Fox News, and more. His book Assume The Position is available at Amazon.Com. Kouri’s own website is located at http://jimkouri.us 


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