The Immigration Threat Hollywood Just Doesn't Get

by LT. COLONEL JAMES G. ZUMWALT, USMC (RET) February 10, 2017

Two incidents, occurring almost eight decades and thousands of miles apart, provide us with an important lesson about the challenging times in which we live.

In the early morning hours of March 17, 1938, bespectacled Soviet economist Nikolai Kondratiev, 46, was marched in front of a firing squad near Moscow and shot. The unimposing Kondratiev was considered such a threat to the Soviet Union, Josef Stalin personally had ordered his death.

A brilliant economist, Kondratiev had closely studied historical patterns, developing the "Kondratiev wave" concept. The theory enabled him to predict the economic rise and fall of empires and nation states.

But, as far as Stalin was concerned, Kondratiev's financial forecasting tool had a major flaw - it predicted the eventual collapse of the Soviet Union. While Kondratiev understood the Soviet system could not sustain itself and would one day fail, no one else was to know this truth. More than half a century later, the concept proved accurate.

On Jan. 26, 2017, in Hollywood, California, actor David Harbour had the stage, with microphone in hand, at the Screen Actors Guild Awards. His science-fiction television series "Stranger Things" just received the Best Ensemble Drama award. He used the opportunity to launch into a rant against President Donald Trump and the immigration ban.

To understand the link between these two incidents, we first need focus on Harbour's comments.

Harbour never was a cop but plays one on television. Perhaps this "toughened him up" to threaten "to punch some people in the face" who he accuses of trying to destroy "the weak and disenfranchised" - an indirect reference to Trump.

Reading from notes - worrisome as indicative he actually gave his comments some forethought - Harbour said, "We are united in that we are all human beings and we are all together on this horrible, painful, joyous, exciting and mysterious ride that is being alive. Now, as we act in the continuing narrative of Stranger Things, we 1983 Midwesterners will repel bullies."

As Hollywood elites applauded Harbour's rant, one wonders if they understood Islam's believers could only shake their heads in disbelief, undoubtedly thinking, "What stupid kafirs."

It is important to understand the Quran labels as "kafir" anyone not believing its words nor that they came direct from Allah. Westerners believe kafir is a nice term for "non-believer." However, its meaning goes far beyond that. It is an Arab word with the most derogatory meaning, similar to the N-word for African-Americans. In calling someone kafir, Muslims seek to convey the message the person is not even human.

Thus, while Harbour claims "we are all human beings," lamenting an immigration ban imposed against seven violent Muslim nations, he naively fails to recognize the Muslims he welcomes as fellow human beings totally reject granting him reciprocity.

It is doubtful before launching his anti-Trump tirade, Harbour read the Quran - or the executive order the president signed to implement the ban. Nor is Harbour probably aware in 2011 Barack Obama, after two Iraqi refugees were arrested on terrorism charges, stopped processing Iraqi refugee requests for six months. Neither Harbour nor anyone else protested Obama's action back then.

Nor is it likely Harbour has read the once-secret strategy of the Muslim Brotherhood "of grand jihad in eliminating and destroying the Western civilization from within and ‘sabotaging' its miserable house by their hands and the hands of the believers..." This is to be done via "hijrah" - mass emigrations to the West to transplant Islam and Shariah there.

It's also unlikely is Harbour knows the Brotherhood's Supreme Guide, Muhammad Badi, declared war against the U.S. in 2010  - a declaration still in force today.

The Brotherhood, seeking to replace our laws with Shariah, counts on the help of "useful idiots" - many of whom seem easily to be found in Hollywood  - who refuse to educate themselves concerning Islam's goals. Harbour is the perfect example, yearning to feel good about promoting politically correct idealism while ignoring the reality of Islam's threat because he lacks knowledge about it.

Kafirs disbelieving Islam sees them as less than equal need consider the refusal by the 57 Muslim member states of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) to accept the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights, or UDHR.

The UDHR deems all human life equal - a standard OIC rejects for failing to restrict humanity to the Shariah-imposed standard of Islam's believers alone.

Harbour is not a lone wolf among Hollywood elites in launching anti-Trump/anti-immigration attacks. He has been joined by Ashton Kutcher and Rihanna. While taking advantage of their celebrity status to criticize, they refuse to educate themselves on such matters before speaking out on them.

It is doubtful any of them are aware the Islamic threat in Europe today results in deployment of half the French army to stop terrorism - not on foreign soil - but on their own! And, as shown Feb. 3 by a Muslim terrorist who attacked French soldiers in Paris near the Louvre museum, the threat is not an idle one.

Meanwhile, we hear nothing from Hollywood concerning an American hero, U.S. Navy SEAL William Owens. He was killed in a Jan. 26 counterterrorism raid on an al-Qaida compound in Yemen that also killed 14 militants and yielded a treasure trove of documents. As courageous warriors like Owens take the fight against terrorism overseas to minimize it here at home, no word of thanks emanates from Harbour, Kutcher or Rihanna.

There is irony in how Kondratiev and Harbour, do and do not, respectively, grasp reality. While the former grasped the importance of historical patterns, the latter does not.

Kondratiev's "sin" was having too much historical knowledge in a country where information flow was limited to manipulate opinion. The sin for Hollywood's elite is, with unlimited information about Islam available, they refuse to access it to espouse educated opinions.

Kondratiev's thirst for knowledge ultimately was his undoing. Harbour's lack of knowledge will, ultimately, be his. Sadly, as he and his cohorts show us, Hollywood just doesn't get it.

A version of this piece also appeared on http://www.wnd.com/    

Lt. Colonel James G. Zumwalt, USMC (Ret.), is a retired Marine infantry officer who served in the Vietnam war, the U.S. invasion of Panama and the first Gulf war. He is the author of "Bare Feet, Iron Will--Stories from the Other Side of Vietnam's Battlefields," "Living the Juche Lie: North Korea's Kim Dynasty" and "Doomsday: Iran--The Clock is Ticking." He frequently writes on foreign policy and defense issues.


blog comments powered by Disqus


FSM Archives

10 year FSM Anniversary

More in PUBLICATIONS ( 1 OF 25 ARTICLES )