Exclusive: America's Most Forgotten: The Victims of Illegal Alien Crime – Houston Police Officer Rodney Johnson

by CAROLYN COOKE, AMERICA’S MOST FORGOTTEN: THE VICTIMS OF ILLEGAL ALIEN CRIME July 15, 2009
Editor’s note: This is the next in a continuing seriesabout the forgotten victims of illegal alien crime – weekly stories you do not see in the mainstream media.
 
America’s Most Forgotten is dedicated to the all of the innocent people and their families who have been victimized by illegal aliens as a result of the refusal of our elected officials to enforce United States immigration law and to secure our borders. Americans remain unprotected from this unwanted invasion of unidentified people from across the world. No region of the country has been spared and the citizens presented come from all walks of life. Crisscrossing the nation, we have a predominantly African-American neighborhood in LA, then we skip to an affluent, successful woman in New York City and then to a rural Mississippi family hoping to escape big city crime and then to a Native American in small town. And on, and on, and on...
 
Texas – Houston Police Officer Rodney Johnson
 
Houston police officer Rodney Johnson was shot multiple times in the face and back by an illegal alien he had taken into custody for going 20 mph over the speed limit and driving without a license.
 
The word “hero” is often tossed around cavalierly in today’s culture, its meaning broadened to cover the most superficial acts of self-sacrifice. The life of fallen Houston police officer Rodney Johnson illustrates the more noble and traditional definition of a “hero.” He lived his life as a devoted family man, committed to protecting Americans by serving in the United States Army, and for the last 12 years, the residents of Houston, Texas.
 
Rodney Johnson genuinely believed he could make a difference in the lives of others and he proved it on numerous occasions. During his years as a police officer, Rodney Johnson received two Lifesaving Awards from the Houston Police Department and a Medal of Valor from the state of Texas for his work on the Southeast Gang Task Force. He was recognized for saving a disabled driver trapped in rising flood waters and rescuing mentally impaired children from a burning house. These were not singular acts of courage, but representative of the way the officer carried out his duties as a member of the HPD.
 
“Rodney Johnson was more than a man, bigger than life”, his sister, Susan Johnson, said after the jury sentenced his murderer, illegal alien Juan Leonardo Quintero, to life in prison without parole. Stories of his kindness, his commitment and his valor would be told by the many who knew him throughout the trial of Quintero.
 
The man with “a big soul and a big heart” died on September 21, 2006.
 
Officer Johnson, 40 years old, the father of five children and the devoted husband of Joslyn, was shot to death during a routine traffic stop. He pulled over a white Ford pickup truck, driven by Quintero, for going 50 mph in a 30 mph zone. Officer Johnson handcuffed Quintero, did a pat down search and put him in the rear seat of his patrol car after he determined Quintero was driving without a license. Unfortunately, he did not detect a 9mm pistol in Quintero’s waistband under the layers of his clothing Quintero wore to work as a landscaper under the hot Texas sun. Quintero managed to extract the gun by moving his hands under his feet and bringing them forward. Johnson was in the driver’s seat filling out paperwork.
 
Quintero shot Johnson three times in the face as he turned toward the back seat after being grazed by a bullet to the back of his head. He then shot the officer four times in his upper torso. Though mortally wounded, Johnson was able to push the emergency button – the last act he would carry out in the line of duty.
 
A tow truck driver was the first to arrive at the scene after receiving an earlier call from Johnson. As the driver approached the police car, Quintero fired a shot at him. He missed and the driver took cover. Police found Quintero in the back of Johnson’s police car, trying to escape, still handcuffed and holding the pistol in his hands.
 
Rodney Johnson was transported to Ben Taub Hospital where he died. Word of the shooting spread and the sidewalks outside of the hospital were lined with police officers waiting for information, and later, mourning his passing.
 
Quintero’s excuse for the cowardly murder of the HPD officer was that Johnson had disrespected him by taking him into custody, instead of simply giving him a ticket. Witnesses said Quintero called the dying American hero a “nigger” and shouted profanities.
 
 
It was estimated more than 4,000 people attended Officer Rodney Johnson’s funeral. Law enforcement officers from around the country joined his family, friends and fellow police HPD officers in the crowded church to mourn his passing.
 
To the many who knew Officer Johnson, he was a “big teddy bear.” Standing 6 feet, 5 inches tall, he could appear intimidating, but he was very kind and gentle.
 
The Johnson children, ages 14 to 19, are sad their father will not be with them to celebrate the important events of their lives. Eldest daughter Amber Johnson, in a statement read by a friend, said, “I’m very saddened and depressed for you not being able to see me graduate from high school, college or giving me away on my wedding day.”
 
Quintero was charged with capital murder and pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. The defense argued he perceived a threat that was not there because of a brain injury he suffered as a child. The reason of insanity defense was rejected in the guilt-innocent phase of the testimony.
 
Joslyn Johnson was to describe the demeanor of her husband’s murderer as she testified, “He sat there with a silly smirk on his face – he never showed any kind of emotion, or remorse.”
 
The jury took only five hours to deliberate before finding Quintero guilty of capital murder, but they chose life in prison over the death penalty on May 20, 2008. One juror stated the reason for her decision for the lesser sentence, “I believe he [Quintero] has value. He’s loved by many of his family and friends, and that was number one. I felt like he has potential.”
 
“If any case ever warranted, the death penalty, this certainly did,” Joslyn Johnson, wife and fellow police officer said after the verdict was announced.
 
Johnson’s family and many in the HPD, including the Houston Police Officers Union were shocked and disappointed that Quintero did not receive the most severe punishment. Joslyn Johnson sobbed, “My husband’s life meant nothing – that’s what I felt.” The family fears life in prison as a “cop killer” would elevate Quintero to celebrity status in one of the prison’s gangs.
 
Juan Leonardo Quintero had been arrested for priors but because of Houston’s sanctuary city policy, his immigration status was never questioned. In 1999 he was convicted of molesting a twelve year old girl and was deported. The jury was not allowed to hear testimony on this conviction. He had several DWI arrests. Quintero was issued an ID by the state of Texas following his illegal re-entry into the United States.
 
A decorated American hero’s life was taken by an illegal alien, once deported for a heinous act of child abuse. Our porous borders stand in welcome to all repeat offenders who know they have nothing to fear from a United States government that refuses to protect its citizens. Our government’s solution to the problem is to give all illegal aliens, and their families, amnesty regardless of criminal record while in the United States or background checks from countries of origin.
 
Americans should not have to live in fear in their own neighborhoods.
Enforcement legislation, passed by a few states, has led illegal aliens to leave because the magnets of jobs and taxpayer benefits have been removed. This is a dirty little secret that elected officials in Washington on both sides of the aisle do not want you to know.
Are you concerned about this epidemic of death at the hands of illegal aliens? Tell your elected officials what you think.
Contact the White House
Comments: 202.456.111
Switchboard: 202.456.1414
FAX: 202.456.2461
Webmail: http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/  

Click here for United States Senate contact information.
Click here for the United States House of Representatives contact information.
FamilySecurityMatters.org Contributing Editor Carolyn Cooke is an American citizen activist committed to the preservation of a sovereign United States.

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